Stereo predecessor

This time we are looking on the crossword clue for: Stereo predecessor.
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Possible Answers: MONO, HIFI.

Random information on the term “MONO”:

Numeral or number prefixes are prefixes derived from numerals or occasionally other numbers. In English and other European languages, they are used to coin numerous series of words, such as unicycle – bicycle – tricycle, dyad – triad – decade, biped – quadruped, September – October – November – December, decimal – hexadecimal, sexagenarian – octogenarian, centipede – millipede, etc. There are two principal systems, taken from Latin and Greek, each with several subsystems; in addition, Sanskrit occupies a marginal position. There is also an international set of metric prefixes, which are used in the metric system, and which for the most part are either distorted from the forms below or not based on actual number words.

In the following prefixes, a final vowel is normally dropped before a root that begins with a vowel, with the exceptions of bi-, which is bis- before a vowel, and of the other monosyllables, du-, di-, dvi-, tri-, which are invariable.

The cardinal series are derived from cardinal numbers, such as the English one, two, three. The multiple series are based on adverbial numbers like the English once, twice, thrice. The distributives originally meant one each, two each or one by one, two by two, etc., though that meaning is now frequently lost. The ordinal series is based on ordinal numbers such as the English first, second, third. For numbers higher than 2, the ordinal forms are also used for fractions; only the fraction ½ has special forms.

MONO on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “HIFI”:

Reel-to-reel or open-reel audio tape recording is the form of magnetic tape audio recording in which the recording medium is held on a reel, rather than being securely contained within a cassette. In use, the supply reel or feed reel containing the tape is mounted on a spindle; the end of the tape is manually pulled out of the reel, threaded through mechanical guides and a tape head assembly, and attached by friction to the hub of a second, initially empty takeup reel.

Reel-to-reel systems use a tape that is  1⁄4 inches (6.35 mm) in width and normally moves at 7.5 or 3.75 inches (19 or 9.5 cm) per second. This compares to 0.15 inches (3.81 mm) wide and 1.875 inches (4.75 cm) per second for a cassette (although some open reel machines support other speeds as per section below). By writing out the same audio signal across more tape, reel-to-reel systems offer much higher fidelity, at the cost of much larger tapes. In spite of the larger tapes, less convenient use and generally higher cost media, reel-to-reel systems remained popular in audiophile settings into the 1980s.

HIFI on Wikipedia

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