Sit-up targets

This time we are looking on the crossword clue for: Sit-up targets.
it’s A 14 letters crossword puzzle definition. See the possibilities below.

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Possible Answers: ABS, BELLIES.

Last seen on: –LA Times Crossword 19 Sep 21, Sunday
The Washington Post Crossword – Mar 28 2021
LA Times Crossword 28 Mar 21, Sunday
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Dec 18 2020
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Oct 28 2020
Jonesin’ – Jul 7 2020
Thomas Joseph – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Dec 16 2019
Thomas Joseph – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Nov 28 2019
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Nov 6 2019
Thomas Joseph – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Oct 21 2019
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Aug 30 2019
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Aug 10 2019
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Dec 24 2018
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Nov 8 2018
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Oct 12 2018

Random information on the term “ABS”:

The rectus abdominis muscle, also known as the “abdominals” or “abs”, is a paired muscle running vertically on each side of the anterior wall of the human abdomen, as well as that of some other mammals. There are two parallel muscles, separated by a midline band of connective tissue called the linea alba. It extends from the pubic symphysis, pubic crest and pubic tubercle inferiorly, to the xiphoid process and costal cartilages of ribs V to VII superiorly. The proximal attachments are the pubic crest and the pubic symphysis. It attaches distally at the costal cartilages of ribs 5-7 and the xiphoid process of the sternum.

The rectus abdominis muscle is contained in the rectus sheath, which consists of the aponeuroses of the lateral abdominal muscles. Bands of connective tissue called the tendinous intersections traverse the rectus abdominus, which separates this parallel muscle into distinct muscle bellies. The outer, most lateral line, defining the “abs” is the linea semilunaris. In the abdomens of people with low body fat, these bellies can be viewed externally and are commonly referred to as “four”, “six”, “eight”, or even “ten packs”, depending on how many are visible; although six is the most common.

ABS on Wikipedia