Safari sight

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Possible Answers: RHINO, LION, GNU, OKAPI, GNUS, ZEBRA, HIPPO, POPUPAD.

Last seen on: –LA Times Crossword 15 Nov 19, Friday
Thomas Joseph – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Nov 6 2019
LA Times Crossword 19 Oct 19, Saturday

Random information on the term “LION”:

Lion was a weekly British comics periodical published by Fleetway (a subsidiary of IPC, the International Publishing Corporation) from 23 February 1952 to 18 May 1974. It lasted for 1,156 issues.

Lion was first published on 23 February 1952, and was a weekly boys’ adventure comic designed to compete with Eagle, the popular weekly comic that had introduced Dan Dare. Lion’s first issue contained a mix of text stories and comic strips; its flagship story was Captain Condor – Space Ship Pilot, a science fiction adventure in the Dan Dare mould. The premiere issue also contained the first adventure of Robot Archie (called The Jungle Robot in early adventures) who would go on to become one of the title’s most popular characters. The most popular story was Paddy Payne written by Val Holding and drawn by Joe Colquhoun. Reg “Skipper” Clarke ran the letters feature.

Editor Bernard Smith was always proud to say that he had the latest issue of Lion delivered to Buckingham Palace every Friday, the young Prince Charles being an avid reader. In 1960, Prince Charles was 11 years old.

LION on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “GNU”:

The Access to Knowledge (A2K) movement is a loose collection of civil society groups, governments, and individuals converging on the idea that access to knowledge should be linked to fundamental principles of justice, freedom, and economic development.

The Berlin Declaration on Open Access to Knowledge in the Sciences and Humanities from 2003 is a major declaration reflecting the goals of the movement in relation to academic publishing.

In October 2004, the Geneva declaration on the future of the World Intellectual Property Organization emerged from a call from Brazil and Argentina for a development agenda for the World Intellectual Property Organization, and was supported by hundreds organizations. Supporters included the Free Software Foundation, with a statement Towards a “World Intellectual Wealth Organisation”: Supporting the Geneva Declaration.

One of the proposals of the declaration was to a «call for a Treaty on Access to Knowledge and Technology. The Standing Committee on Patents and the Standing Committee on Copyright and Related Rights should solicit views from member countries and the public on elements of such a treaty».

GNU on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “OKAPI”:

The de Havilland DH.14 Okapi was a British two-seat day bomber of the 1910s built by de Havilland. The aircraft was designed as an Airco DH.4 and DH.9 replacement, but it never entered production.


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The Okapi was a scaled-up version of the Airco DH.9 with a bigger engine, (the Rolls Royce Condor) designed as a replacement for the DH.4 and DH.9. Three aircraft were built, but due to the end of the First World War the Royal Air Force was reluctant to accept them. The third aircraft was the first to fly, and it was completed by Airco at Hendon as the DH.14A, a two-seat long-range mail plane. The aircraft, registered G-EAPY, was bought by F.S. Cotton who intended to try for the Australian government’s £10,000 prize for a flight between England and Australia. His plans were overtaken by events when Keith and Ross Smith won the prize before Cotton was ready. The aircraft did attempt the first flight between London and Cape Town in February 1920, but it reached only as far as Italy, where it force-landed near Messina. Although repaired, the aircraft was written off in another forced landing on 24 July 1920. The two military aircraft were completed by de Havilland at Stag Lane Aerodrome in 1921 and used for trials; one suffered a fatal crash at Burnham Beeches on 10 February 1922 and no production aircraft were ordered.

OKAPI on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “ZEBRA”:

E. q. quagga †
E. q. burchellii
E. q. boehmi
E. q. borensis
E. q. chapmani
E. q. crawshayi
E. q. selousi

The plains zebra (Equus quagga, formerly Equus burchellii), also known as the common zebra or Burchell’s zebra, or locally as the “quagga” (not to be confused with the extinct subspecies), is the most common and geographically widespread species of zebra. It ranges from the south of Ethiopia through East Africa to as far south as Botswana and eastern South Africa. The plains zebra remains common in game reserves, but is threatened by human activities such as hunting for its meat and hide, as well as competition with livestock and encroachment by farming on much of its habitat.

Subspecies include the extinct quagga and six recognised extant subspecies, though there is great variation in coat patterns between individuals. The striping pattern is unique among ungulates in the region, and its functions are disputed. Suggested functions include crypsis, forms of motion camouflage, social signaling and recognition, and discouraging biting flies. As of 2016, the plains zebra is classified as Near Threatened by IUCN.

ZEBRA on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “HIPPO”:

Wardia vastatrix J.F.Hennen & M.M.Hennen (2003)

Hemileia vastatrix is a fungus of the order Pucciniales (previously also known as Uredinales) that causes coffee leaf rust (CLR), a disease that is devastating to susceptible coffee plantations. Coffee serves as the obligate host of coffee rust, that is, the rust must have access to and come into physical contact with coffee (Coffea sp.) in order to survive.

The mycelium with uredinia looks yellow-orange and powdery, and appears on the underside of leaves as points ~0.1 mm in diameter. Young lesions appear as chlorotic or pale yellow spots some millimetres in diameter, the older being a few centimetres in diameter. Hyphae are club-shaped with tips bearing numerous pedicels on which clusters of urediniospores are produced.

Telia are pale yellowish, teliospores often produced in uredinia; teliospores more or less spherical to limoniform, 26–40 × 20–30 µm in diameter, wall hyaline to yellowish, smooth, 1 µm thick, thicker at the apex, pedicel hyaline.

HIPPO on Wikipedia

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