Old hand

This time we are looking on the crossword clue for: Old hand.
it’s A 8 letters crossword puzzle definition. See the possibilities below.

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Possible Answers: TAR, PRO, VET, VETERAN, EXPERT, STAGER.

Last seen on: –Thomas Joseph – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Jan 15 2021
Thomas Joseph – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Dec 22 2020
Thomas Joseph – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Oct 9 2020
Thomas Joseph – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Feb 24 2020
Thomas Joseph – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Nov 8 2019
Wall Street Journal Crossword – November 05 2019 – Fruit Turnovers
Thomas Joseph – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Mar 21 2019
Thomas Joseph – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Jan 29 2019
NY Times Crossword 30 Dec 18, Sunday

Random information on the term “TAR”:

Tar is the common name for the resinous, partially combusted particulate matter produced by the burning of tobacco and other plant material in the act of smoking. Tar is toxic and damages the smoker’s lungs over time through various biochemical and mechanical processes. Tar also damages the mouth by rotting and blackening teeth, damaging gums, and desensitizing taste buds. Tar includes the majority of mutagenic and carcinogenic agents in tobacco smoke. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), for example, are genotoxic via epoxidation.

There is a common misconception that the tar in cigarettes is equivalent to the tar used on roads.[citation needed] As a result of this, cigarette companies in the United States, when prompted to give tar/nicotine ratings for cigarettes, usually use “tar,” in quotation marks, to indicate that it is not the road surface component. Tar is occasionally referred to as an acronym for total aerosol residue, a backronym coined in the mid-1960s.

TAR on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “PRO”:

A professional is a member of a profession or any person who earns their living from a specified professional activity. The term also describes the standards of education and training that prepare members of the profession with the particular knowledge and skills necessary to perform their specific role within that profession. In addition, most professionals are subject to strict codes of conduct, enshrining rigorous ethical and moral obligations. Professional standards of practice and ethics for a particular field are typically agreed upon and maintained through widely recognized professional associations, such as the IEEE. Some definitions of “professional” limit this term to those professions that serve some important aspect of public interest and the general good of society.

In some cultures, the term is used as shorthand to describe a particular social stratum of well-educated workers who enjoy considerable work autonomy and who are commonly engaged in creative and intellectually challenging work.

PRO on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “VET”:

A veterinary physician, colloquially called a vet, shortened from veterinarian (American English, Australian English) or veterinary surgeon (British English), is a professional who practices veterinary medicine by treating disease, disorder, and injury in animals.

In many countries, the local nomenclature for a veterinarian is a regulated and protected term, meaning that members of the public without the prerequisite qualifications and/or licensure are not able to use the title. In many cases, the activities that may be undertaken by a veterinarian (such as treatment of illness or surgery in animals) are restricted only to those professionals who are registered as a veterinarian. For instance, in the United Kingdom, as in other jurisdictions, animal treatment may only be performed by registered veterinary physicians (with a few designated exceptions, such as paraveterinary workers), and it is illegal for any person who is not registered to call themselves a veterinarian or prescribe any treatment.

VET on Wikipedia