Off

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Possible Answers: ERASE, IDLE, AFAR, LES, SENT, LESS, ODD, ASIDE, AWAY, SLAY, AMISS, NOGO, AWRY, ASKEW, UNLIT, DOIN, ASTRAY, INERROR, NOTON, ERRING, MISTAKEN, TAINTED, IMPRECISE, HELPESCAPEPUNISHMENT.

Last seen on: –NY Times Crossword 22 Aug 20, Saturday
Wall Street Journal Crossword – July 18 2020 – Rename That Tune
NY Times Crossword 3 Nov 19, Sunday
Wall Street Journal Crossword – Jan 3 2019 – Change of Clothes

Random information on the term “IDLE”:

The following tables list notable software packages that are nominal IDEs; standalone tools such as source code editors and GUI builders are not included. These IDEs are listed in alphabetical order of the supported language.

Community Edition: Freeware

Go to this page: Comparison of IDE choices for Haxe programmers

Java has strong IDE support, due to a combination of reflection and static-typing making it well-suited for IDE support, and its historical and economic importance. Some of the leading Java IDEs (such as IntelliJ and Eclipse) are also the basis for leading IDEs in other programming languages (e.g. for Python, IntelliJ is rebranded as PyCharm, and Eclipse has the PyDev plugin.)

Using Phonegap it targets mobile devices

IDLE on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “AFAR”:

The Afar (Afar: Qafár), also known as the Danakil, Adali and Odali, are an ethnic group inhabiting the Horn of Africa. They primarily live in the Afar Region of Ethiopia and in northern Djibouti, although some also inhabit the southern point of Eritrea. Afars speak the Afar language, which is part of the Cushitic branch of the Afro-Asiatic family.

Afar society has traditionally been organized into independent kingdoms, each ruled by its own Sultan. Among these were the Sultanate of Aussa, Sultanate of Girrifo, Sultanate of Dawe, Sultanate of Tadjourah, Sultanate of Rahaito, and Sultanate of Goobad.

The earliest surviving written mention of the Afar is from the 13th-century Andalusian writer Ibn Sa’id, who reported that they inhabited the area around the port of Suakin, as far south as Mandeb, near Zeila. They are mentioned intermittently in Ethiopian records, first as helping Emperor Amda Seyon in a campaign beyond the Awash River, then over a century later when they assisted Emperor Baeda Maryam when he campaigned against their neighbors the Dobe’a.

AFAR on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “LES”:

The Launch Entry Suit (LES), known as the “pumpkin suit”, was a partial pressure suit worn by all Space Shuttle crews for the ascent and entry portions of flight from STS-26 (1988) to STS-65 (1994). It was completely phased out by STS-88 (late 1998) and replaced by the ACES suit. The suit was manufactured by the David Clark Company of Worcester, Massachusetts.

The LES was first worn by U.S. Air Force pilots in the mid-1970s[citation needed], replacing a similar suit worn by SR-71 and U-2 pilots, and was identical to the suits worn by X-15 pilots and Gemini astronauts[citation needed]. Unlike the ACES suit, which is a full-pressure suit, the high-altitude suits were partial pressure suits, thus requiring a rubber diaphragm around the wearer’s face. With the development of the Space Shuttle, and the inclusion of ejection seats on the Space Shuttle Columbia on the first four flights (STS-1 to STS-4), NASA decided to adopt modified versions of the suit; the modifications being the attachments to the parachute harness, and the adoption of inflatable bladders in the legs to prevent the crew from passing out during reentry. One other modification, a mount for prescription glasses, was incorporated for astronaut John W. Young, who wore modified bifocal reading glasses (resembling aviator sunglasses, but with the top portion, usually for distance seeing, being of regular glass, and the bottom, for reading, of the wearer’s prescription) during the flight.

LES on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “LESS”:

Less (sometimes stylized as LESS) is a dynamic style sheet language that can be compiled into Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) and run on the client side or server side. Designed by Alexis Sellier, Less is influenced by Sass and has influenced the newer “SCSS” syntax of Sass, which adapted its CSS-like block formatting syntax. Less is open source. Its first version was written in Ruby; however, in the later versions, use of Ruby has been deprecated and replaced by JavaScript. The indented syntax of Less is a nested metalanguage, as valid CSS is valid Less code with the same semantics. Less provides the following mechanisms: variables, nesting, mixins, operators and functions; the main difference between Less and other CSS precompilers being that Less allows real-time compilation via less.js by the browser.

Less allows variables to be defined. Variables in Less are defined with an at sign (@). Variable assignment is done with a colon (:).

During translation, the values of the variables are inserted into the output CSS document.

LESS on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “ODD”:

Parity is a mathematical term that describes the property of an integer’s inclusion in one of two categories: even or odd. An integer is even if it is ‘evenly divisible’ by two (the old-fashioned term “evenly divisible” is now almost always shortened to “divisible”) and odd if it is not even. For example, 6 is even because there is no remainder when dividing it by 2. By contrast, 3, 5, 7, 21 leave a remainder of 1 when divided by 2. Examples of even numbers include −4, 0, 8, and 1738. In particular, zero is an even number. Some examples of odd numbers are −5, 3, 9, and 73.

A formal definition of an even number is that it is an integer of the form n = 2k, where k is an integer; it can then be shown that an odd number is an integer of the form n = 2k + 1. It is important to realize that the above definition of parity applies only to integer numbers, hence it cannot be applied to numbers like 1/2, 4.201. See the section “Higher mathematics” below for some extensions of the notion of parity to a larger class of “numbers” or in other more general settings.

ODD on Wikipedia