Needle

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Possible Answers: RILE, SEW, TEASE, NAG, RIDE, RIB, IRK, PROD, TWIT, ANNOY, BUG, JOSH, TAUNT, HYPO, PESTER, NAGAT, RAZZ, STYLUS, IRRITATE.

Last seen on: –Wall Street Journal Crossword – April 16 2020 – Making Amends
NY Times Crossword 5 Nov 19, Tuesday
LA Times Crossword 12 Sep 19, Thursday

Random information on the term “SEW”:

In everyday language, a stitch in the context of embroidery or hand-sewing is defined as the movement of the embroidery needle from the backside of the fabric to the front side and back to the back side. The thread stroke on the front side produced by this is also called stitch. In the context of embroidery, an embroidery stitch means one or more stitches that are always executed in the same way, forming a figure. Embroidery stitches are also called stitches for short.

Embroidery stitches are the smallest units in embroidery. Embroidery patterns are formed by doing many embroidery stitches, either all the same or different ones, either following a counting chart on paper, following a design painted on the fabric or even working freehand.

Embroidery uses various combinations of stitches. Each embroidery stitch has a special name to help identify it. These names vary from country to country and region to region. Some embroidery books will include name variations. Taken by themselves the stitches are mostly simple to execute, however when put together the results can be extremely complex.

SEW on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “NAG”:

The Numerical Algorithms Group (NAG) is a software company which provides methods for the solution of mathematical and statistical problems, and offers services to users of High performance computing (HPC) systems. Its products and services are employed by tens of thousands of users from Global 500 companies, universities, supercomputing sites and numerous independent software vendors. As a not-for-profit organization, NAG reinvests its surpluses into the research and development of its products and services, and the fostering of new numerical and scientific talent. NAG serves its customers from offices in Oxford, Manchester, Chicago, Tokyo and Taipei, through field sales staff in France and Germany, and via a global network of distributors.

NAG was founded by Brian Ford and others in 1970 as the Nottingham Algorithms Group, a collaborative venture between the universities of Birmingham, Leeds, Manchester, Nottingham and Oxford, and the Atlas Computer Laboratory (now part of the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory). The original aim of the project was the development of a library of numerical and statistical subroutines for the ICL 1906A and 1906S machines which were in use at each of these sites. Code and algorithms for the library were contributed to the project by experts in the project, and elsewhere (for example, some of the linear algebra code was written by Jim Wilkinson, who was an early supporter of the NAG project).

NAG on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “RIDE”:

Amusement rides, sometimes called carnival rides, are mechanical devices or structures that move people to create enjoyment.

Flat rides are usually considered to be those that move their passengers in a plane generally parallel to the ground, such as rides that spin around a vertical axis, like carousels and twists, and ground level rides such as bumper cars and The Whip.

Gravity rides are those where gravity is responsible for all or some of the movement, and where any vertical movement is not about a fixed point, such as roller coasters and water slides.

Vertical rides usually move their passengers in a vertical plane and around a fixed point, such as Ferris wheels, Enterprise, and Skydiver.

RIDE on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “RIB”:

In vertebrate anatomy, ribs (Latin: costae) are the long curved bones which form the rib cage. In most tetrapods, ribs surround the chest, enabling the lungs to expand and thus facilitate breathing by expanding the chest cavity. They serve to protect the lungs, heart, and other internal organs of the thorax. In some animals, especially snakes, ribs may provide support and protection for the entire body.

Humans have 24 ribs (12 pairs). The first seven sets of ribs, known as “true ribs” (costae verae) also known as vertebrosternal ribs, are directly attached to the sternum through the costal cartilage. Rib 1 is unique and harder to distinguish than other ribs. It is a short, flat, C-shaped bone. The vertebral attachment can be found just below the neck and the majority of this bone can be found above the level of the clavicle. Ribs 2 through 7 have a more traditional appearance and become longer and less curved as they progress downwards. The following five sets are known as “false ribs” (costae spuriae), three of these sharing a common cartilaginous connection to the sternum, while the last two (eleventh and twelfth ribs) are termed floating ribs (costae fluctuantes) or vertebral ribs. They are attached to the vertebrae only, and not to the sternum or cartilage coming off of the sternum. Some people lack one of the two pairs of floating ribs, while others have a third pair.[citation needed]

RIB on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “IRK”:

This category has the following 3 subcategories, out of 3 total.

The following 72 pages are in this category, out of 72 total. This list may not reflect recent changes (learn more).

The following 7 files are in this category, out of 7 total.

IRK on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “PROD”:

A cattle prod, also called a stock prod, is a handheld device commonly used to make cattle or other livestock move by striking or poking them. An electric cattle prod is a stick with electrodes on the end which is used to make cattle move through a relatively high-voltage, low-current electric shock The electric cattle prod is said to have been invented by Texas cattle baron Robert J. Kleberg, Jr. of the King Ranch around 1930, although versions were sold as early as 1917.

Ranchers and farmers typically use the term “cattle prods” mainly to refer to simple non-electrified fiberglass or metal goads used to physically encourage cattle into motion; the majority of people living outside of rural areas use the term ‘cattle prod’ exclusively for the electrified variant. Most ranchers and farmers refer to electric cattle prods as “hotshots”[citation needed] (this is an example of a genericized trademark; one of the most prominent brands of electric prod is Hot-Shot).

In an electric cattle prod, which is the precursor to the modern day stun gun, dual surface electrodes produce a very high voltage/very low amperage electric arc between them, which, when pressed against conductive skin, produces a painful but superficial electric shock which stimulates the target to cease their current activity and move in the direction opposite the source of the pain. With higher amperage, the cattle prod is the equivalent of a stun gun and functions exactly the same way. Cattle prods are the precursor to direct contact electric stun guns used against humans, and their basic operating principles are the same: The major differences are primarily in the matter of size and power: cattle prods tend to have a higher electric current and a longer handle than stun guns, which is helpful when dealing with very large, powerful animals or humans as a torture device.

PROD on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “TWIT”:

Coordinates: 38°16′35″N 122°40′03″W / 38.2764301°N 122.6676119°W / 38.2764301; -122.6676119

TWiT.tv, which is the operating trade name of TWiT LLC, is a podcast (although TWiT uses the term “netcast”) network founded by technology broadcaster and author Leo Laporte and run by his wife and company CEO Lisa Laporte. The network began operation in April 2005 with the launch of This Week in Tech. Security Now was the second podcast on the network, debuting in August of that year. Currently, the network hosts twenty-two podcasts and live streaming shows, including The Tech Guy, This Week in Tech, Security Now, FLOSS Weekly, MacBreak Weekly, Tech News Today, Tech News 2Night, and 15 other podcasts covering various topics including technology companies, computer security, social networking, and current technology news.

TWiT founder and owner Laporte, in an October 2009 speech, stated that it grossed revenues of $1.5 million per year, while costs were around $350,000. In November 2014, American Public Media’s Marketplace reported that TWiT makes $6 million in ad revenue a year from 5 million TWiT podcasts downloaded each month, mostly in the form of audio, and that 3,000 to 4,000 people watch its live-streamed shows. On March 18, 2015, prior to the filming of This Week in Google, Leo Laporte stated that TWiT expects to make $7 million in revenue in fiscal year 2015.

TWIT on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “BUG”:

This is a list of common dog crossbreeds.

Originating as crossbreeds, now sustained independently of the parent breeds.

These are dogs created deliberately by crossing two purebred dogs. Sometimes known as “designer dogs”, and often given portmanteau names derived from those of the parent breeds. There is a very large number of possible combinations, and the following table only lists those most often bred deliberately. Breed associations such as the AKC, the UKC, and the CKC, do not recognize “designer dog” crosses as breeds.

Suitable breed for children, is a low maintenance breed with minimal sheddinghttp://dogs.petbreeds.com/l/223/Cavachon

BUG on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “HYPO”:

This category has the following 9 subcategories, out of 9 total.

The following 65 pages are in this category, out of 65 total. This list may not reflect recent changes (learn more).

HYPO on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “RAZZ”:

Razz is a form of stud poker that is normally played for ace-to-five low (lowball poker). The object of Razz is to make the lowest possible five-card hand from the seven cards you are dealt. In Razz, straights and flushes do not count against the player for low, and the ace always plays low. Thus, the best possible Razz hand is 5-4-3-2-A, or 5 high, also known as “the wheel” or “the bicycle”. Deuce-to-seven Razz is also sometimes played. Razz is featured in the mixed game rotation H.O.R.S.E. as the “R” in the game’s name.

Razz is similar to seven-card stud, except the lowest hand wins. Seven cards are dealt to each player, but only the five best cards (generally the five lowest unpaired cards) are used in forming a complete hand.

Razz is usually played with a maximum of eight players, with limit betting, meaning that there is a fixed amount that can be bet per player per round. Each player antes and is dealt two cards face down (the hole cards), and one card face up (the “door card”). The highest door card showing has to “bring it in” – put in the mandatory first bet, which is usually one third to one half of the regular bet. The player responsible for the bring-in can instead opt to “complete the bet”, i.e. make a whole regular bet. If he opts to make a normal bring-in, the remaining players can either call his bet or “complete”, by raising to a regular bet. From that point the betting continues in regular bet increments.

RAZZ on Wikipedia