Morsel

This time we are looking on the crossword clue for: Morsel.
it’s A 6 letters crossword puzzle definition. See the possibilities below.

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Possible Answers: TASTE, ORT, BIT, SCRAP, BITE, CRUMB, TIDBIT, NIBLET.

Last seen on: –Wall Street Journal Crossword – January 30 2020 – Get in Shape
Canadiana Crossword – Feb 25 2019
Canadiana Crossword – Dec 17 2018
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Nov 5 2018

Random information on the term “ORT”:

No official regulation

German (Deutsch [ˈdɔʏtʃ] ( listen)) is a West Germanic language that is mainly spoken in Central Europe. It is the most widely spoken and (co-) official language in Germany, Austria, Switzerland, South Tyrol (Italy), the German-speaking Community of Belgium, and Liechtenstein. It is also one of the three official languages of Luxembourg. The languages which are most similar to German are the other members of the West Germanic language branch: Afrikaans, Dutch, English, the Frisian languages, Low German (Low Saxon), Luxembourgish, and Yiddish. German is the second most widely spoken Germanic language, after English.

One of the major languages of the world, German is the first language of about 95 million people worldwide and the most widely spoken native language in the European Union. German also is the fourth most widely taught foreign language in the US (after Spanish, French and American Sign language) and third in the EU (after English and French; at lower secondary level), the second most commonly used scientific language as well as the fourth most widely used language on websites (after English, Russian and Japanese). The German-speaking countries are ranked fifth in terms of annual publication of new books, with one tenth of all books (including e-books) in the world being published in the German language.

ORT on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “BIT”:

Drill bits are cutting tools used to remove material to create holes, almost always of circular cross-section. Drill bits come in many sizes and shape and can create different kinds of holes in many different materials. In order to create holes drill bits are attached to a drill, which powers them to cut through the workpiece, typically by rotation. The drill will grasp the upper end of a bit called the shank in the chuck.

Drill bits come in standard sizes, described in the drill bit sizes article. A comprehensive drill bit and tap size chart lists metric and imperial sized drill bits alongside the required screw tap sizes. There are also certain specialized drill bits that can create holes with a non-circular cross-section.

While the term drill may refer to either a drilling machine or a drill bit for use in a drilling machine. In this article, for clarity, drill bit or bit is used throughout to refer to a bit for use in a drilling machine, and drill refers always to a drilling machine.

BIT on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “BITE”:

Occlusion, in a dental context, means simply the contact between teeth. More technically, it is the relationship between the maxillary (upper) and mandibular (lower) teeth when they approach each other, as occurs during chewing or at rest.

Malocclusion is the misalignment of teeth and jaws, or more simply, a “bad bite”. Malocclusion can cause a number of health and dental problems.

Static occlusion refers to contact between teeth when the jaw is closed and stationary, while dynamic occlusion refers to occlusal contacts made when the jaw is moving. Dynamic occlusion is also termed as articulation. During chewing, there is no tooth contact between the teeth on the chewing side of the mouth.

Centric occlusion is the occlusion of opposing teeth when the mandible is in centric relation. Centric occlusion is the first tooth contact and may or may not coincide with maximum intercuspation. It is also referred to as a person’s habitual bite, bite of convenience, or intercuspation position (ICP). Centric relation, not to be confused with centric occlusion, is a relationship between the maxilla and mandible.

BITE on Wikipedia