Latin 101 word

This time we are looking on the crossword clue for: Latin 101 word.
it’s A 14 letters crossword puzzle definition. See the possibilities below.

Did you find what you needed?
We hope you did!. If you are still unsure with some definitions, don’t hesitate to search them here with our crossword solver.

Possible Answers: ESSE, ERAT, AMO, AMAT, AMAS.

Last seen on: –Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Aug 3 2022
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Jul 18 2022
NY Times Crossword 2 Jan 22, Sunday
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Dec 24 2021
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Mar 12 2021
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Feb 1 2021
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Jan 20 2021
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Dec 12 2020
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Nov 27 2020
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Nov 25 2020
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Nov 3 2020
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Oct 30 2020
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Oct 21 2020
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Dec 26 2019
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Sep 4 2019
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Sep 3 2019
NY Times Crossword 9 Aug 19, Friday
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Jul 30 2019
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Mar 29 2019
The Washington Post Crossword – Jan 12 2019
LA Times Crossword 12 Jan 19, Saturday
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Nov 15 2018
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Oct 23 2018

Random information on the term “AMO”:

Ablation is removal of material from the surface of an object by vaporization, chipping, or other erosive processes. Examples of ablative materials are described below, and include spacecraft material for ascent and atmospheric reentry, ice and snow in glaciology, biological tissues in medicine and passive fire protection materials.

Biological ablation is the removal of a biological structure or functionality.

Genetic ablation is another term for gene silencing, in which gene expression is abolished through the alteration or deletion of genetic sequence information. In cell ablation, individual cells in a population or culture are destroyed or removed. Both can be used as experimental tools, as in loss-of-function experiments.

In glaciology and meteorology, ablation—the opposite of accumulation—refers to all processes that remove snow, ice, or water from a glacier or snowfield.[page needed] Ablation refers to the melting of snow or ice that runs off the glacier, evaporation, sublimation, calving, or erosive removal of snow by wind. Air temperature is typically the dominant control of ablation, with precipitation exercising secondary control. In a temperate climate during ablation season, ablation rates typically average around 2 mm/h. Where solar radiation is the dominant cause of snow ablation (e.g., if air temperatures are low under clear skies), characteristic ablation textures such as suncups and penitentes may develop on the snow surface.

AMO on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “AMAT”:

Applied Materials, Inc. is an American corporation that supplies equipment, services and software to enable the manufacture of semiconductor (integrated circuit) chips for electronics, flat panel displays for computers, smartphones and televisions, and solar products. The company also supplies equipment to produce coatings for flexible electronics, packaging and other applications. The company is headquartered in Santa Clara, California, in the Silicon Valley.

Founded in 1967 by Michael A. McNeilly and others, Applied Materials went public in 1972. In subsequent years, the company diversified, until James C. Morgan became CEO in 1976 and returned the company’s focus to its core business of semiconductor manufacturing equipment. By 1978, sales increased by 17%.

In 1984, Applied Materials became the first U.S. semiconductor equipment manufacturer to open its own technology center in Japan and the first semiconductor equipment company to operate a service center in China. In 1987, Applied introduced a CVD machine called the Precision 5000, which differed from existing machines by incorporating diverse processes into a single machine that had multiple process chambers.

AMAT on Wikipedia