Kid

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Possible Answers: TOT, LAD, TAD, TEASE, RIB, BABE, GAG, TYKE, NEEDLE, JEST, JIVE, JOSH, JAPE, JOKE, CHILD, YOUTH, PUTON, STRINGALONG, JOKEAROUND, LITTLESHAVER, YOUNGONE.

Last seen on: –LA Times Crossword 29 Nov 20, Sunday
NY Times Crossword 27 Oct 20, Tuesday
LA Times Crossword 17 Aug 20, Monday
NY Times Crossword 8 Aug 20, Saturday
LA Times Crossword 6 Jul 20, Monday
The Washington Post Crossword – Jun 25 2020
LA Times Crossword 25 Jun 20, Thursday
Wall Street Journal Crossword – June 25 2020 – It’s a Stretch
LA Times Crossword 8 Dec 19, Sunday
NY Times Crossword 25 Oct 19, Friday
Wall Street Journal Crossword – August 10 2019 – Simon Says
The Washington Post Crossword – May 8 2019
LA Times Crossword 8 May 19, Wednesday
Daily Celebrity Crossword – 5/2/19 Top 40 Thursday
Daily Celebrity Crossword – 5/1/19 Wayback Wednesday
LA Times Crossword 19 Feb 19, Tuesday
LA Times Crossword 25 Jan 19, Friday
The Washington Post Crossword – Jan 25 2019
Wall Street Journal Crossword – Nov 24 2018 – Comparatively Speaking

Random information on the term “TOT”:

Terms of trade (TOT) refers to the relative price of imports in terms of exports and is defined as the ratio of export prices to import prices. It can be interpreted as the amount of import goods an economy can purchase per unit of export goods.

An improvement of a nation’s terms of trade benefits that country in the sense that it can buy more imports for any given level of exports. The terms of trade may be influenced by the exchange rate because a rise in the value of a country’s currency lowers the domestic prices of its imports but may not directly affect the prices of the commodities it exports.

The term (barter) terms of trade was first coined by the US American economist Frank William Taussig in his 1927 book International Trade. However, an earlier version of the concept can be traced back to the English economist Robert Torrens and his book The Budget: On Commercial and Colonial Policy, published in 1844, as well as to John Stuart Mill’s essay Of the Laws of Interchange between Nations; and the Distribution of Gains of Commerce among the Countries of the Commercial World, published in the same year, though allegedly already written in 1829/30.

TOT on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “LAD”:

Lad culture (also laddish culture and laddism) is a British subculture initially associated with the Britpop movement. Arising in the early 1990s, the image of the “lad” – or “new lad” – was that of a generally middle class figure espousing attitudes typically attributed to the working classes. The subculture involves young men assuming an anti-intellectual position, shunning sensitivity in favour of drinking, violence, and sexism.

The term “new lad” was coined by journalist Sean O’Hagan in a 1993 article about a young, brash and boisterous economist called David “Lad Lad Lad” Sturrock in Arena.

Part of “the postmodern transformation of masculinity…the 1990s ‘new lad’ was a clear reaction to the ‘new man’…most clearly embodied in current men’s magazines, such as Maxim, FHM and Loaded, and marked by a return to hegemonic masculine values of sexism [and] male homosociality”. At a time when “men saw themselves as battered by feminism”, one could also consider that “laddishness is a response to humiliation and indignity…the girl-power! girl-power! female triumphalism which echoes through the land”.

LAD on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “TAD”:

Tad is an unincorporated community in Kanawha County, West Virginia, United States. Tad is 7.5 miles (12.1 km) east of Charleston. Tad has a post office with ZIP code 25201.

An early postmaster gave the community the name of his son, Talmadge “Tad” Dunlap.

TAD on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “RIB”:

In vertebrate anatomy, ribs (Latin: costae) are the long curved bones which form the rib cage. In most tetrapods, ribs surround the chest, enabling the lungs to expand and thus facilitate breathing by expanding the chest cavity. They serve to protect the lungs, heart, and other internal organs of the thorax. In some animals, especially snakes, ribs may provide support and protection for the entire body.

Humans have 24 ribs (12 pairs). The first seven sets of ribs, known as “true ribs” (costae verae) also known as vertebrosternal ribs, are directly attached to the sternum through the costal cartilage. Rib 1 is unique and harder to distinguish than other ribs. It is a short, flat, C-shaped bone. The vertebral attachment can be found just below the neck and the majority of this bone can be found above the level of the clavicle. Ribs 2 through 7 have a more traditional appearance and become longer and less curved as they progress downwards. The following five sets are known as “false ribs” (costae spuriae), three of these sharing a common cartilaginous connection to the sternum, while the last two (eleventh and twelfth ribs) are termed floating ribs (costae fluctuantes) or vertebral ribs. They are attached to the vertebrae only, and not to the sternum or cartilage coming off of the sternum. Some people lack one of the two pairs of floating ribs, while others have a third pair.[citation needed]

RIB on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “GAG”:

A gag cartoon (a.k.a. panel cartoon or gag panel) is most often a single-panel cartoon, usually including a caption beneath the drawing. A pantomime cartoon carries no caption. In some cases, dialogue may appear in speech balloons, following the common convention of comic strips.

As the name implies—”gag” being a show business term for a comedic idea—these cartoons are most often intended to provoke laughter. Popular magazines that have featured gag cartoons include Punch, The New Yorker and Playboy. Some publications, such as Humorama, have used cartoons as the main focus of the magazine, rather than articles and fiction.

Captions are usually concise, to fit on a single line. Gag cartoons of the 1930s and earlier occasionally had lengthy captions, sometimes featuring dialogue between two characters depicted in the drawing; over time, cartoon captions became shorter. A well-known 1928 cartoon in The New Yorker, drawn by Carl Rose and captioned by E. B. White, shows a mother trying to convince her young daughter to finish her meal. “It’s broccoli, dear.” “I say it’s spinach and I say the hell with it.”

GAG on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “JIVE”:

Jive talk, also known as Harlem jive, the argot of jazz, jazz jargon, vernacular of the jazz world, slang of jazz, and parlance of hip, was the distinctive slang that developed in Harlem, where jive or jazz was played, and was subsequently adopted more widely in US society, peaking in the 1940s. H. L. Mencken, in his The American Language, defined it as “an amalgam of Negro-slang from Harlem and the argots of drug addicts and the pettier sort of criminals, with occasional additions from the Broadway gossip columns and the high school campus”.

This was documented in works such as Cab Calloway’s Hepster’s Dictionary: Language of Jive (1939), which was the first dictionary published by a black person, and Dan Burley’s Original Handbook of Harlem Jive, which was compiled and published in 1944 at the suggestion of Harlem poet Langston Hughes. Besides referring to the music scene, much of the argot related to drugs such as marijuana. For example, Mezz Mezzrow gave this sample:

JIVE on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “JAPE”:

Jape is an Irish electronic–rock band from Dublin. Formed as a side project by Richie Egan whilst part of The Redneck Manifesto, they have released five albums to date; Cosmosphere (2003), The Monkeys in the Zoo Have More Fun Than Me (2004), Ritual (2008), Ocean of Frequency (2011), and This Chemical Sea(2015). Jape’s wider discography includes the EP, Jape is Grape (2007), as well as a number of singles, including “Floating” and “Phil Lynott”. The band have performed at festivals and events such as Glastonbury, Electric Picnic, Lovebox and Hard Working Class Heroes and provided support for The Flaming Lips at Belsonic in Belfast in August 2008.

The first and second albums received airplay on alternative national radio in Ireland. The Monkeys in the Zoo Have More Fun Than Me’s opening track, “Floating”, became a popular single on late night alternative music radio shows and attracted the attention of Brendan Benson during a visit to Dublin. Benson now covers the track whilst performing live with his band The Raconteurs, as do the Belgian bastard pop duo Soulwax during their DJ sets.

JAPE on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “CHILD”:

Congenital hemidysplasia with ichthyosiform erythroderma and limb defects (also known as “CHILD syndrome”) is a genetic disorder with onset at birth seen almost exclusively in females.:485 The disorder is related to CPDX2, and also has skin and skeletal abnormalities, distinguished by a sharp midline demarcation of the ichthyosis with minimal linear or segmental contralateral involvement.:501

The acronym was introduced in 1980.

The acronym CHILD stands for the symptoms of the syndrome:

CHILD syndrome is inherited in an X-linked dominant fashion and is associated with a mutation of the NSDHL gene. This gene encodes for the enzyme 3beta-hydroxy sterol dehydrogenase which catalyzes a step in the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway. Locations of this enzyme include the membranes of the endoplasmic reticulum and on the surface of intracellular lipid storage droplets. A shortage of the enzyme may allow potentially toxic byproducts of cholesterol production to accumulate in the body’s tissues. Mutations of the gene have been reported in all three types: missense, nonsense, and stop mutations, all resulting in loss of function of NSDHL. The type of mutation is not believed to be the underlining reason for clinical variations in the extent of involvement but rather the differences in the pattern of X inactivation. Although researchers suspect that low levels of cholesterol and/or an accumulation of other substances are responsible for disrupting the growth and development of many body parts, the precise rationale for the laterality of the syndrome has yet to be determined.

CHILD on Wikipedia