Impulse

This time we are looking on the crossword clue for: Impulse.
it’s A 7 letters crossword puzzle definition. See the possibilities below.

Did you find what you needed?
We hope you did!. If you are still unsure with some definitions, don’t hesitate to search them here with our crossword solver.

Possible Answers: URGE, YEN, WHIM, NISUS.

Last seen on: –The Washington Post Crossword – Oct 20 2020
LA Times Crossword 20 Oct 20, Tuesday
The Telegraph – QUICK CROSSWORD NO: 29,384 – Jun 8 2020
USA Today Crossword – Mar 31 2020
Universal Crossword – Mar 24 2020
USA Today Crossword – Dec 16 2019
NY Times Crossword 29 Sep 19, Sunday
LA Times Crossword 1 Aug 19, Thursday

Random information on the term “URGE”:

Ellen Victoria Futter (born September 21, 1949) is president of the American Museum of Natural History. She previously served as president of Barnard College for 13 years.

Futter was born in New York City and attended high school in Port Washington, New York. She spent two years at the University of Wisconsin–Madison before transferring to Barnard College, where she graduated Phi Beta Kappa magna cum laude in 1971. She was elected as a student representative to the Barnard’s board of trustees in 1971 and was subsequently elected to full membership to complete the term of Arthur Goldberg, former Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. Futter earned her J.D. from Columbia Law School in 1974.

Futter began her career as an associate at the Wall Street law firm of Milbank, Tweed, Hadley & McCloy, where she practiced corporate law. In 1980, Futter took a leave of absence from Milbank, Tweed to serve as Barnard’s acting president for one year. At the end of that period, she was appointed president of the college; at the time, she was the youngest president of any college in the United States. She served as president until 1993, when she joined the American Museum of Natural History.

URGE on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “YEN”:

₳ ​ ฿ ​ ₵ ​¢ ​₡ ​₢ ​ $ ​₫ ​₯ ​֏ ​ ₠ ​€ ​ ƒ ​₣ ​ ₲ ​ ₴ ​ ₭ ​ ₺ ​₾ ​ ℳ ​₥ ​ ₦ ​ ₧ ​₱ ​₰ ​£ ​ ៛ ​₽ ​₹ ₨ ​ ₪ ​ ৳ ​₸ ​₮ ​ ₩ ​ ¥

The Yen sign (¥) is a currency sign used by the Chinese yuan (CNY) and the Japanese yen (JPY) currencies. This monetary symbol resembles a Latin letter Y with a double stroke. The base unit of both currencies shared the same Chinese character/Kanji (traditional Chinese: 圓; simplified Chinese: 圆; Japanese Shinjitai: 円) that means “circle”. It is pronounced yuán in Mandarin Chinese and en in Standard Japanese. In mainland China, the Chinese character is more frequently written in everyday situations using the simpler character 元, which has the same pronunciation as the formal financial character 圓 in Mandarin (but not in Japanese and in some Chinese varieties). The symbol is usually placed before the value it represents, for example 20.

In the Japanese-language locales of Microsoft operating systems, the yen sign in code page 932 character encoding has the same byte value as the backslash in ASCII. It is also used wherever a backslash is used, such as the directory separator character and the general escape character, essentially making it a backslash with the appearance of a yen sign, a peculiarity that stems from JIS X 0201.

YEN on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “WHIM”:

WHIM Syndrome (or Warts, Hypogammaglobulinemia, Immunodeficiency, and Myelokathexis syndrome) is a rare congenital immunodeficiency disorder characterized by chronic noncyclic neutropenia.

Patients exhibit increased susceptibility to bacterial and viral infections, especially from common serotype human papilloma virus, resulting in warts on the hands and feet starting in childhood. Myelokathexis refers to retention (kathexis) of neutrophils in the bone marrow (myelo). In addition, lymphocytes and IgG antibody levels (gammaglobulins) are often deficient.

WHIM syndrome results from autosomal dominant mutations in the gene for the chemokine receptor, CXCR4, resulting in a carboxy-terminus truncation of the receptor of between ten and 19 residues. The gene mutant is located on 2q21. The truncation of the receptor protein results in the inability of downregulation after stimulation. Thus, the receptor remain in an activated state. WHIM syndrome is one of only a few diseases directly and primarily caused by an aberrant chemokine, making its molecular biology important in understanding the role of cell signaling and trafficking.

WHIM on Wikipedia