Go

This time we are looking on the crossword clue for: Go.
it’s A 2 letters crossword puzzle definition. See the possibilities below.

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Possible Answers: STAB, TRY, EXIT, PEP, LEAVE, ELAPSE, PEE, DEPART, WORK, REPAIR, ATTEMPT, PROCEED, BEOFF, HITTHEBRICKS, TAKELEAVE, HEADOUT, URINATE.

Last seen on: –The Washington Post Crossword – Aug 14 2020
LA Times Crossword 14 Aug 20, Friday
The Guardian – Quick Crossword No 15,585 – Apr 20 2020

Random information on the term “STAB”:

Stab is an unincorporated community in Pulaski County, Kentucky, United States.

A post office called Stab was established in 1922, and remained in operation until it was discontinued in 1994. The name Stab was chosen in part for its brevity; the first choice had been rejected as too long by postal authorities.

STAB on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “TRY”:

The conversion, try (American football, also known as a point(s) after touchdown, PAT, or extra point), or convert (Canadian football) occurs immediately after a touchdown during which the scoring team is allowed to attempt to score one extra point by kicking the ball through the uprights in the manner of a field goal, or two points by bringing the ball into the end zone in the manner of a touchdown; depending on league rules, one point may also be scored by manner of a safety.

Attempts at a try or convert are scrimmage plays, with the ball initially placed at any point between the hash marks, at the option of the team making the attempt. The yard line that attempts are made from depends on the league and the type of try or convert being attempted.

If the try or convert is scored by kicking the ball through the uprights, the team gets an additional one point for their touchdown, bringing their total for that score from six points to seven. If two points are needed or desired, a two-point conversion may be attempted by running or passing from scrimmage. A successful touchdown conversion brings the score’s total to eight.

TRY on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “EXIT”:

A door is a moving structure used to block off, and allow access to, an entrance to or within an enclosed space, such as a building or vehicle. Doors normally consist of a panel that swings on hinges on the edge, but there are also doors that slide or spin inside of a space. Similar exterior structures to doors are called gates.

Typically, doors have an interior side that faces the inside of a space and an exterior side that faces the outside of that space. In many cases the interior side of a door mostly matches its exterior side, but in some other cases there are sharp contrasts between the two sides, such as in the case of a vehicle door.

When open, doors admit people, animals, ventilation or light. The door is used to control the physical atmosphere within a space by enclosing the air drafts, so that interiors may be more effectively heated or cooled. Maybe, people open and close doors as a sign of privacy. Example: A door might be closed and someone is inside, because they are feeling a sort of violation letting people in at that time. Doors are significant in preventing the spread of fire. They also act as a barrier to noise. Many doors are equipped with locking mechanisms to allow entrance to certain people and keep out others. As a form of courtesy and civility, people often knock before opening a door and entering a room.

EXIT on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “PEP”:

The Packetized Ensemble Protocol (PEP) is a protocol used by Telebit modems. It uses the full bandwidth (3000 Hz) of the telephone lines and dividing it in hundreds of channels. The modem only chooses the channels that are error free, which makes PEP usable on bad lines. The disadvantage is the relatively long time it takes to switch between sending and receiving data. PEP was able to achieve half-duplex speeds of up to 18,000bit/s, with TurboPEP upping this to 23,000bit/s with the Worldblazer model.

PEP on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “PEE”:

P (named pee /ˈpiː/ ) is the 16th letter of the modern English alphabet and the ISO basic Latin alphabet.

In English orthography and most other European languages, ⟨p⟩ represents the sound /p/.

A common digraph in English is ⟨ph⟩, which represents the sound /f/, and can be used to transliterate ⟨φ⟩ phi in loanwords from Greek. In German, the digraph ⟨pf⟩ is common, representing a labial affricate /pf/.

Most English words beginning with ⟨p⟩ are of foreign origin, primarily French, Latin, Greek, and Slavic;[citation needed] these languages preserve Proto-Indo-European initial *p. Native English cognates of such words often start with ⟨f⟩, since English is a Germanic language and thus has undergone Grimm’s law; a native English word with initial /p/ would reflect Proto-Indo-European initial *b, which is so rare that its existence as a phoneme is disputed.

However, native English words with non-initial ⟨p⟩ are quite common; such words can come from either Kluge’s law or the consonant cluster /sp/ (PIE *p has been preserved after s).

PEE on Wikipedia