Frozen dessert

This time we are looking on the crossword clue for: Frozen dessert.
it’s A 14 letters crossword puzzle definition. See the possibilities below.

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Possible Answers: ICE, MOUSSE, SUNDAE, SORBET, BOMBE, GLACE, GELATO, SHERBET, FRAPPE, PARFAIT, ICEMILK.

Last seen on: –The Sun – Two Speed Crossword – Dec 12 2020
NY Times Crossword 15 Nov 20, Sunday
Thomas Joseph – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Sep 15 2020
Thomas Joseph – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Feb 12 2020
Irish Times Simplex Crossword – Oct 20 2018

Random information on the term “ICE”:

1BMQ, 1IBC, 1ICE, 1RWK, 1RWM, 1RWN, 1RWO, 1RWP, 1RWV, 1RWW, 1RWX, 1SC1, 1SC3, 1SC4, 2FQQ, 2H48, 2H4W, 2H4Y, 2H51, 2H54, 2HBQ, 2HBR, 2HBY, 2HBZ, 3D6F, 3D6H, 3D6M, 3E4C, 3NS7, 5FNA

834

12362

ENSG00000137752

ENSMUSG00000025888

P29466

P29452

NM_033294
NM_033295

NM_009807

NP_150636
NP_150637

NP_033937.2
NP_033937

Caspase-1/Interleukin-1 converting enzyme (ICE) is an evolutionarily conserved enzyme that proteolytically cleaves other proteins, such as the precursors of the inflammatory cytokines interleukin 1β and interleukin 18 as well as the pyroptosis inducer Gasdermin D, into active mature peptides. It plays a central role in cell immunity as an inflammatory response initiator. Once activated through formation of an inflammasome complex, it initiates a proinflammatory response through the cleavage and thus activation of the two inflammatory cytokines, interleukin 1β (IL-1β) and interleukin 18 (IL-18) as well as pyroptosis, a programmed lytic cell death pathway, through cleavage of Gasdermin D. The two inflammatory cytokines activated by Caspase-1 are excreted from the cell to further induce the inflammatory response in neighboring cells.

ICE on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “SHERBET”:

Sherbet is a fizzy powder sweet, usually eaten by dipping a lollipop or liquorice, or licking it on a finger.

The word “sherbet” is from Turkish şerbet, which is from Persian شربت, which in turn comes from “sharbat”, Arabic شَرْبَة sharba, a drink, from “shariba” to drink. Also called “sorbet”, which comes from French “sorbet”, from Italian “sorbetto” and in turn from Turkish “şerbet”. The word is cognate to syrup in English. Historically it was a cool effervescent or iced fruit soft drink. The meaning, spelling and pronunciation have fractured between different countries. It is usually spelled “sherbet”, but a common pronunciation changes this to “sherbert”.

It is not to be confused with the North American “sherbet”, which is a variant of the iced dessert sorbet.

Beginning with the 19th century sherbet powder (soda powder) became popular. “Put a spoonful of the powder in a cup of water, mix it and drink it as soon as possible, during the time of sparkling. … Because this way the most of acid of air is lost … it is more practicable to put the powder into the mouth and flush it with some water.” 2 g of sodium bicarbonate and 1.5 g of tartaric acid were separately packed in little coloured paper bags.[clarification needed]

SHERBET on Wikipedia