Flop

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Possible Answers: SAG, DUD, LOSER, LEMON, DOG, BOMB, FAIL, DROOP, BUST, FIASCO, INVERT, TURKEY, LAYANEGG, FOUNDER, STINKAROO, BOMBONBROADWAY, TAKEANOSEDIVE, NOTAMOUNTTOAHILLOFBEANS.

Last seen on: –USA Today Crossword – Jan 3 2021
NY Times Crossword 29 Aug 20, Saturday
LA Times Crossword 27 Oct 19, Sunday
Thomas Joseph – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Aug 24 2019
Daily Celebrity Crossword – 1/25/19 Sports Fan Friday
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Jan 18 2019
Thomas Joseph – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Dec 7 2018
Thomas Joseph – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Sep 12 2018

Random information on the term “SAG”:

4ZWJ

6295

20215

n/a

ENSMUSG00000056055

P10523

P20443

NM_000541

NM_009118

NP_000532

NP_033144.1
NP_033144

S-arrestin is a protein that in humans is encoded by the SAG gene.

Members of arrestin/beta-arrestin protein family are thought to participate in agonist-mediated desensitization of G-protein-coupled receptors and cause specific dampening of cellular responses to stimuli such as hormones, neurotransmitters, or sensory signals. S-arrestin, also known as S-antigen, is a major soluble photoreceptor protein that is involved in desensitization of the photoactivated transduction cascade. It is expressed in the retina and the pineal gland and inhibits coupling of rhodopsin to transducin in vitro. Additionally, S-arrestin is highly antigenic, and is capable of inducing experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis. Mutations in this gene have been associated with Oguchi disease, a rare autosomal recessive form of night blindness.

SAG on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “DUD”:

Bomb disposal is the process by which hazardous explosive devices are rendered safe. Bomb disposal is an all-encompassing term to describe the separate, but interrelated functions in the military fields of explosive ordnance disposal (EOD) and improvised explosive device disposal (IEDD), and the public safety roles of public safety bomb disposal (PSBD) and the bomb squad.

“Bomb disposal” does not encompass the remediation of soils polluted with explosive materials.

The first professional civilian bomb squad was established by Sir Vivian Dering Majendie. As a Major in the Royal Artillery, Majendie investigated an explosion on 2 October 1874 in the Regent’s Canal, when the barge ‘Tilbury’, carrying six barrels of petroleum and five tons of gunpowder, blew up, killing the crew and destroying Macclesfield Bridge and cages at nearby London Zoo.

In 1875, he framed The Explosives Act, the first modern legislation for explosives control. He also pioneered many bomb disposal techniques, including remote methods for the handling and dismantling of explosives. His advice during the Fenian dynamite campaign of 1881-85 was officially recognised as having contributed to the saving of lives. After Victoria Station was bombed on 26 February 1884 he defused a bomb with a clockwork mechanism which might have gone off at any moment.

DUD on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “DOG”:

The African wild dog (Lycaon pictus), also known as African hunting dog, African painted dog or painted wolf, is a canid native to Sub-Saharan Africa. It is the largest of its family in Africa, and the only extant member of the genus Lycaon, which is distinguished from Canis by its fewer toes and its dentition, which is highly specialised for a hypercarnivorous diet. It is classified as endangered by the IUCN, as it has disappeared from much of its original range. The current population has been estimated at roughly 39 subpopulations containing 6,600 adults, only 1,400 of which are fully grown. The decline of these populations is ongoing, due to habitat fragmentation, human persecution, and disease outbreaks.

The African wild dog is a highly social animal, living in packs with separate dominance hierarchies for males and females. Uniquely among social carnivores, it is the females rather than the males that scatter from the natal pack once sexually mature, and the young are allowed to feed first on carcasses. The species is a specialised diurnal hunter of antelopes, which it catches by chasing them to exhaustion. Like other canids, it regurgitates food for its young, but this action is also extended to adults, to the point of being the bedrock of African wild dog social life. It has few natural predators, though lions are a major source of mortality, and spotted hyenas are frequent kleptoparasites.

DOG on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “BOMB”:

An aerial bomb is a type of explosive weapon intended to travel through the air with predictable trajectories, usually designed to be dropped from an aircraft. Aerial bombs include a vast range and complexity of designs, from unguided gravity bombs to guided bombs, hand tossed from a vehicle, to needing a large specially built delivery vehicle; or perhaps be the vehicle itself such as a glide bomb, instant detonation or delay-action bomb. The act is termed aerial bombing. As with other types of explosive weapons, aerial bombs are designed to kill and injure people and destroy materiel through the projection of blast and fragmentation outwards from the point of detonation.

The first bombs delivered to their targets by air were launched on unmanned balloons, carrying a single bomb, by the Austrians against Venice in 1849.

The first bombs dropped from a heavier-than-air aircraft were grenades or grenade-like devices. Historically, the first use was by Giulio Gavotti on 1 November 1911, during the Italo-Turkish War.

BOMB on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “FAIL”:

In the motion picture industry, a “box office bomb” or “box office flop” is a film that is viewed as highly unsuccessful or unprofitable during its theatrical run, sometimes following hype regarding its cost, production, or marketing efforts. Generally, any film for which the production and marketing costs exceed the combined revenue recovered after release is considered to have “bombed”.

Gauging the financial success of a film is difficult, and because there is no reliable definition, what makes a box-office bomb can be very subjective. Not all films that fail to earn back their estimated costs during their theatrical runs are bombs, and the label is generally applied to films that miss earnings projections by a wide margin, particularly when they are very expensive to produce, and sometimes in conjunction with middling or poor reviews (though critical reception has an imperfect connection to box office performance).

Beginning in the 1980s, cinemas started to drop movies that suffered a poor opening weekend.[citation needed] This made the performance of a film on its opening weekend much more crucial to its perception. With the growth of the Internet during the 1990s, chat rooms and websites enabled negative word of mouth to spread rapidly.

FAIL on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “TURKEY”:

 Turkey 63,589,988–65,560,701
(2008 est. of 2015 pop.)
 Northern Cyprus 280,000 d[›]

50,000 b[›][38]

Predominantly Islam[72][73][74][75]

Turkish people (Turkish: Türk ulusu), or the Turks (Turkish: Türkler), also known as Anatolian Turks (Turkish: Anadolu Türkleri), are a Turkic ethnic group and nation living mainly in Turkey and speaking Turkish, the most widely spoken Turkic language. They are the largest ethnic group in Turkey, as well as by far the largest ethnic group among the speakers of Turkic languages. Ethnic Turkish minorities exist in the former lands of the Ottoman Empire. In addition, a Turkish diaspora has been established with modern migration, particularly in Western Europe.

The ethnonym “Turk” may be first discerned in Herodotus’ (c. 484–425 BC) reference to Targitas, first king of the Scythians;[80] furthermore, during the first century AD., Pomponius Mela refers to the “Turcae” in the forests north of the Sea of Azov, and Pliny the Elder lists the “Tyrcae” among the people of the same area.[80] The first definite references to the “Turks” come mainly from Chinese sources in the sixth century. In these sources, “Turk” appears as “Tujue” (Chinese: 突厥; Wade–Giles: T’u-chüe), which referred to the Göktürks.[81][82] Although “Turk” refers to Turkish people, it may also sometimes refer to the wider language group of Turkic peoples.[citation needed]

TURKEY on Wikipedia