Egg on

This time we are looking on the crossword clue for: Egg on.
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Possible Answers: URGE, ABET, PROD, XRAY, IMPEL, SPUR, GOAD, COAX, INCITE, PROVOKE.

Last seen on: –LA Times Crossword 18 Jun 21, Friday
USA Today Crossword – Apr 19 2021
The Sun – Two Speed Crossword – Dec 27 2020
Premier Sunday – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Dec 13 2020
Wall Street Journal Crossword – August 07 2020 – Beam Me Up
Newsday.com Crossword – May 26 2020
Premier Sunday – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Mar 15 2020
LA Times Crossword 11 Nov 19, Monday
NY Times Crossword 3 Nov 19, Sunday
USA Today Crossword – Oct 25 2019
The Washington Post Crossword – Jul 9 2019
LA Times Crossword 9 Jul 19, Tuesday
NY Times Crossword 22 Apr 19, Monday
Newsday.com Crossword – Jan 22 2019
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Dec 31 2018
NY Times Crossword 11 Dec 18, Tuesday

Random information on the term “URGE”:

Ellen Victoria Futter (born September 21, 1949) is president of the American Museum of Natural History. She previously served as president of Barnard College for 13 years.

Futter was born in New York City and attended high school in Port Washington, New York. She spent two years at the University of Wisconsin–Madison before transferring to Barnard College, where she graduated Phi Beta Kappa magna cum laude in 1971. She was elected as a student representative to the Barnard’s board of trustees in 1971 and was subsequently elected to full membership to complete the term of Arthur Goldberg, former Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. Futter earned her J.D. from Columbia Law School in 1974.

Futter began her career as an associate at the Wall Street law firm of Milbank, Tweed, Hadley & McCloy, where she practiced corporate law. In 1980, Futter took a leave of absence from Milbank, Tweed to serve as Barnard’s acting president for one year. At the end of that period, she was appointed president of the college; at the time, she was the youngest president of any college in the United States. She served as president until 1993, when she joined the American Museum of Natural History.

URGE on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “ABET”:

CSAB, Inc., formerly called the Computing Sciences Accreditation Board, Inc., is a non-profit professional organization in the United States, focused on the quality of education in computing disciplines. The Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) and the IEEE Computer Society (IEEE-CS) are the member societies of CSAB. The Association for Information Systems (AIS) was a member society between 2002 and September 2009.

CSAB itself is a member society of ABET, to support the accreditation of several computing (related) disciplines:

Who is doing what:

The Computing Sciences Accreditation Board, Inc. (CSAB) was founded in 1984, with Taylor L. Booth as first president.

Initially, CSAB had its own accreditation commission called the Computer Science Accreditation Commission (CSAC). But in November 1998 CSAB and ABET agreed to integrate CSAB’s accreditation activities within ABET. The result is that in 2000 a reorganized CSAB became a member society of ABET and that, starting with the 2001-2002 cycle, a merged and renamed CSAC operates as the fourth commission of ABET: the Computing Accreditation Commission (CAC).

ABET on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “PROD”:

A cattle prod, also called a stock prod, is a handheld device commonly used to make cattle or other livestock move by striking or poking them. An electric cattle prod is a stick with electrodes on the end which is used to make cattle move through a relatively high-voltage, low-current electric shock The electric cattle prod is said to have been invented by Texas cattle baron Robert J. Kleberg, Jr. of the King Ranch around 1930, although versions were sold as early as 1917.

Ranchers and farmers typically use the term “cattle prods” mainly to refer to simple non-electrified fiberglass or metal goads used to physically encourage cattle into motion; the majority of people living outside of rural areas use the term ‘cattle prod’ exclusively for the electrified variant. Most ranchers and farmers refer to electric cattle prods as “hotshots”[citation needed] (this is an example of a genericized trademark; one of the most prominent brands of electric prod is Hot-Shot).

In an electric cattle prod, which is the precursor to the modern day stun gun, dual surface electrodes produce a very high voltage/very low amperage electric arc between them, which, when pressed against conductive skin, produces a painful but superficial electric shock which stimulates the target to cease their current activity and move in the direction opposite the source of the pain. With higher amperage, the cattle prod is the equivalent of a stun gun and functions exactly the same way. Cattle prods are the precursor to direct contact electric stun guns used against humans, and their basic operating principles are the same: The major differences are primarily in the matter of size and power: cattle prods tend to have a higher electric current and a longer handle than stun guns, which is helpful when dealing with very large, powerful animals or humans as a torture device.

PROD on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “XRAY”:

X-ray crystallography is a technique used for determining the atomic and molecular structure of a crystal, in which the crystalline atoms cause a beam of incident X-rays to diffract into many specific directions. By measuring the angles and intensities of these diffracted beams, a crystallographer can produce a three-dimensional picture of the density of electrons within the crystal. From this electron density, the mean positions of the atoms in the crystal can be determined, as well as their chemical bonds, their disorder, and various other information.

Since many materials can form crystals—such as salts, metals, minerals, semiconductors, as well as various inorganic, organic, and biological molecules—X-ray crystallography has been fundamental in the development of many scientific fields. In its first decades of use, this method determined the size of atoms, the lengths and types of chemical bonds, and the atomic-scale differences among various materials, especially minerals and alloys. The method also revealed the structure and function of many biological molecules, including vitamins, drugs, proteins and nucleic acids such as DNA. X-ray crystallography is still the chief method for characterizing the atomic structure of new materials and in discerning materials that appear similar by other experiments. X-ray crystal structures can also account for unusual electronic or elastic properties of a material, shed light on chemical interactions and processes, or serve as the basis for designing pharmaceuticals against diseases.

XRAY on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “SPUR”:

Spur (1913–1930) was an American thoroughbred racehorse. In 1916, he won eight major races and finished second in the Belmont Stakes. At age four, he equaled the Empire City track record for a mile and a sixteenth on the dirt in winning his second straight Yonkers Handicap. As a sire, standing at James Butler’s Eastview Farm in Tarrytown, New York, Spur’s best progeny was Sting.

Spur died on May 31, 1930 at Eastview Farm.

SPUR on Wikipedia