Distress signal

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Possible Answers: ACHE, SOS, FLARE, MAYDAY.

Last seen on: –USA Today Crossword – Mar 16 2020
Thomas Joseph – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Aug 28 2019
Newsday.com Crossword – Apr 1 2019
Newsday.com Crossword – Mar 26 2019
Newsday.com Crossword – Dec 28 2018

Random information on the term “ACHE”:

An acetylcholinesterase inhibitor (often abbreviated AChEI) or anti-cholinesterase is a chemical or a drug that inhibits the acetylcholinesterase enzyme from breaking down acetylcholine, thereby increasing both the level and duration of action of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine. Acetylcholinesterase inhibitors are classified as reversible, irreversible, or quasi-irreversible (also called pseudo-irreversible).

Acetylcholinesterase inhibitors:

Some major effects of cholinesterase inhibitors:

Administration of reversible cholinoesterase inhibitors is contraindicated with those that have urinary retention due to obstruction.

When used in the central nervous system to alleviate neurological symptoms, such as rivastigmine in Alzheimer’s disease, all cholinesterase inhibitors require doses to be increased gradually over several weeks, and this is usually referred to as the titration phase. Many other types drug treatments may require a titration or stepping up phase. This strategy is used to build tolerance to adverse events or to reach a desired clinical effect. This also prevents accidental overdose and is therefore recommended when initiating treatment with drugs that are extremely potent and/or toxic (drugs with a low therapeutic index).

ACHE on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “SOS”:

This is a list of shipwrecks located off the coast of North Carolina.

SOS on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “FLARE”:

Blue light is an archaic signal, the progenitor of modern pyrotechnic flares. Blue light consists of a loose, chemical composition burned in an open, hand-held hemispherical wooden cup, and so is more akin to the flashpan signals of the Admiral Nelson era than the modern, encased signal flares, often launched by mortar or rifle and suspended by parachute. Widely used during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries for signaling by the world’s military forces, and for general illumination in the civilian sector, blue light was remarkable for its use of poisonous arsenic compounds (realgar and orpiment), which contributed to its replacement by safer flares in the early twentieth century.

“Blue light” was a derisive nickname given to military officers of the 18th and 19th centuries, whose evangelical Christian zeal burned as brightly as its namesake signal, to the chagrin of those less ardent who were subject to the perceived ostentatious piety. Confederate Gen. Stonewall Jackson carried the nickname “Old Blue Lights” during the American Civil War because of his overt religiosity.

FLARE on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “MAYDAY”:

The aircraft emergency frequency (also known as GUARD) is a frequency used on the aircraft band reserved for emergency communications for aircraft in distress. The frequencies are 121.5 MHz for civilian, also known as International Air Distress (IAD) or VHF Guard, and 243.0 MHz for military use, also known as Military Air Distress (MAD) or UHF Guard. Earlier emergency locator transmitters used the guard frequencies to transmit, but an additional frequency of 406 MHz is used by more modern ELTs.

The choice of 121.5 MHz was made by the ICAO in conjunction with ARINC and the ITU.

The main civil voice frequency 121.5 MHz is monitored by most air traffic control towers, FSS services, national air traffic control centers, military air defense and other flight and emergency services, as well as by many commercial aircraft.

In the UK, 121.5 MHz is monitored by the Royal Air Force Distress and Diversion cells (known as “D&D”) at the London Terminal Control Centre and the Shanwick Oceanic Control, from a nationwide network of antennas. Depending on the aircraft’s altitude and location, the personnel in the centres may be able to use triangulation to determine its exact position which can be useful to the pilot if the aircraft is lost or “temporarily unsure of position”.

MAYDAY on Wikipedia