Call on

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Possible Answers: SEE, USE, ASK, TAP, VISIT, INVOKE.

Last seen on: –Wall Street Journal Crossword – January 25 2020 – Cutting Both Ways
NY Times Crossword 10 Nov 19, Sunday
Newsday.com Crossword – May 17 2019
Eugene Sheffer – King Feature Syndicate Crossword – Mar 15 2019
Wall Street Journal Crossword – Nov 15 2018 – Idiosyncratic

Random information on the term “SEE”:

An episcopal see is, in the usual meaning of the phrase, the area of a bishop’s ecclesiastical jurisdiction.

Phrases concerning actions occurring within or outside an episcopal see are indicative of the geographical significance of the term, making it synonymous with “diocese”.

The word “see” is derived from Latin sedes, which in its original or proper sense denotes the seat or chair that, in the case of a bishop, is the earliest symbol of the bishop’s authority. This symbolic chair is also known as the bishop’s cathedra, and is placed in the diocese principal church, which for that reason is called the bishop’s cathedral, from Latin ecclesia cathedralis, meaning the church of the cathedra. The word “throne” is also used, especially in the Eastern Orthodox Church, both for the seat and for the area of ecclesiastical jurisdiction.

The term “see” is also used of the town where the cathedral or the bishop’s residence is located.

Within Roman Catholicism, each diocese is considered to be a see unto itself with a certain allegiance to the See of Rome. The idea of a see as a sovereign entity is somewhat complicated due to the existence of the 23 Particular Churches of the Roman Catholic Church. The Western Church and its Eastern Catholic counterparts all reserve some level of autonomy, yet each also is subdivided into smaller sees (dioceses and archdioceses). The episcopal see of the Pope, the Bishop of Rome, is known as “the Holy See” or “the Apostolic See”, claiming Papal supremacy.

SEE on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “USE”:

The United States of Europe, the European state, the European federation, and Federal Europe are names used to refer to several similar hypothetical scenarios of the unification of Europe as a single sovereign federation of states, similar to the United States of America, both as projected by writers of speculative fiction and science fiction, and by political scientists, politicians, geographers, historians, and futurologists. At present, while the European Union (EU) is not officially a federation, various academic observers regard it as having the characteristics of a federal system.

Specifically, the term United States of Europe – as a direct comparison with the United States of America – would imply that all the European states would acquire a status similar to that of a US state, becoming constituent parts of a European federation acting as one country.

Various versions of the concept have developed over the centuries, many of which are mutually incompatible (inclusion or exclusion of the United Kingdom, secular or religious union, etc.). Such proposals include those from Bohemian King George of Podebrady in 1464; Duc de Sully of France in the seventeenth century; and the plan of William Penn, the Quaker founder of Pennsylvania, for the establishment of a “European Dyet, Parliament or Estates.”

USE on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “ASK”:

Amplitude-shift keying (ASK) is a form of amplitude modulation that represents digital data as variations in the amplitude of a carrier wave. In an ASK system, the binary symbol 1 is represented by transmitting a fixed-amplitude carrier wave and fixed frequency for a bit duration of T seconds. If the signal value is 1 then the carrier signal will be transmitted; otherwise, a signal value of 0 will be transmitted.

Any digital modulation scheme uses a finite number of distinct signals to represent digital data. ASK uses a finite number of amplitudes, each assigned a unique pattern of binary digits. Usually, each amplitude encodes an equal number of bits. Each pattern of bits forms the symbol that is represented by the particular amplitude. The demodulator, which is designed specifically for the symbol-set used by the modulator, determines the amplitude of the received signal and maps it back to the symbol it represents, thus recovering the original data. Frequency and phase of the carrier are kept constant.

ASK on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “TAP”:

A tap (also spigot or faucet: see usage variations) is a valve controlling the release of a liquid or gas.

Water for baths, sinks and basins can be provided by separate hot and cold taps; this arrangement is common in older installations, particularly in public washrooms/lavatories and utility rooms/laundries. In kitchens and bathrooms, mixer taps are commonly used. In this case, hot and cold water from the two valves is mixed before reaching the outlet, allowing the water to emerge at any temperature between that of the hot and cold water supplies. Mixer taps were invented by Thomas Campbell of Saint John, New Brunswick, and patented in 1880.

For baths and showers, mixer taps frequently incorporate some sort of pressure balancing feature so that the hot/cold mixture ratio will not be affected by transient changes in the pressure of one or other of the supplies. This helps avoid scalding or uncomfortable chilling as other water loads occur (such as the flushing of a toilet). Rather than two separate valves, mixer taps frequently use a single, more complex, valve controlled by a single handle (single handle mixer). The handle moves up and down to control the amount of water flow and from side to side to control the temperature of the water. Especially for baths and showers, the latest designs are thermostatic mixing valves that do this using a built-in thermostat, and can be mechanical or electronic. There are also faucets with color LEDs to show the temperature of the water.

TAP on Wikipedia