Badger

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it’s A 6 letters crossword puzzle definition. See the possibilities below.

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Possible Answers: TEASE, NAG, RIDE, BAIT, BESET, NEEDLE, HASSLE, HARASS, PESTER, NAGAT, HOUND, HECTOR, HECKLE, PLAGUE, NAGTENACIOUSLY, DRIVEONEUPAWALL.

Last seen on: –The Telegraph – QUICK CROSSWORD NO: 29,471 – Sep 17 2020
NY Times Crossword 24 May 20, Sunday
The Washington Post Crossword – Oct 7 2018
LA Times Crossword 7 Oct 18, Sunday

Random information on the term “NAG”:

The Numerical Algorithms Group (NAG) is a software company which provides methods for the solution of mathematical and statistical problems, and offers services to users of High performance computing (HPC) systems. Its products and services are employed by tens of thousands of users from Global 500 companies, universities, supercomputing sites and numerous independent software vendors. As a not-for-profit organization, NAG reinvests its surpluses into the research and development of its products and services, and the fostering of new numerical and scientific talent. NAG serves its customers from offices in Oxford, Manchester, Chicago, Tokyo and Taipei, through field sales staff in France and Germany, and via a global network of distributors.

NAG was founded by Brian Ford and others in 1970 as the Nottingham Algorithms Group, a collaborative venture between the universities of Birmingham, Leeds, Manchester, Nottingham and Oxford, and the Atlas Computer Laboratory (now part of the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory). The original aim of the project was the development of a library of numerical and statistical subroutines for the ICL 1906A and 1906S machines which were in use at each of these sites. Code and algorithms for the library were contributed to the project by experts in the project, and elsewhere (for example, some of the linear algebra code was written by Jim Wilkinson, who was an early supporter of the NAG project).

NAG on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “RIDE”:

Amusement rides, sometimes called carnival rides, are mechanical devices or structures that move people to create enjoyment.

Flat rides are usually considered to be those that move their passengers in a plane generally parallel to the ground, such as rides that spin around a vertical axis, like carousels and twists, and ground level rides such as bumper cars and The Whip.

Gravity rides are those where gravity is responsible for all or some of the movement, and where any vertical movement is not about a fixed point, such as roller coasters and water slides.

Vertical rides usually move their passengers in a vertical plane and around a fixed point, such as Ferris wheels, Enterprise, and Skydiver.

RIDE on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “HASSLE”:

This category has the following 15 subcategories, out of 15 total.

The following 178 pages are in this category, out of 178 total. This list may not reflect recent changes (learn more).

HASSLE on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “HECTOR”:

Roland (Frankish: *Hrōþiland) (died 15 August 778) was a Frankish military leader under Charlemagne who became one of the principal figures in the literary cycle known as the Matter of France. The historical Roland was military governor of the Breton March, responsible for defending Francia’s frontier against the Bretons. His only historical attestation is in Einhard’s Vita Karoli Magni, which notes he was part of the Frankish rearguard killed by rebellious Basques in Iberia at the Battle of Roncevaux Pass.

The story of Roland’s death at Roncevaux Pass was embellished in later medieval and Renaissance literature. He became the chief paladin of the emperor Charlemagne and a central figure in the legendary material surrounding him, collectively known as the Matter of France. The first and most famous of these epic treatments was the Old French Chanson de Roland of the eleventh century.

Two masterpieces of Italian Renaissance poetry, the Orlando Innamorato and Orlando Furioso, are even further detached from history than the earlier Chansons. Roland is poetically associated with his sword Durendal, his horse Veillantif, and his oliphant horn.

HECTOR on Wikipedia