Annoys

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it’s A 6 letters crossword puzzle definition. See the possibilities below.

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Possible Answers: IRES, IRKS, NAGS, RILES, TEASES, EATSAT, BUGS, MIFFS, BOTHERS, PESTERS, GALLS, HASSLES, NAGSAT, GETSTO, PEEVES, CHAFES, VEXES, MOLESTS, RUBSTHEWRONGWAY, PUTSOUT, GRATESON, IRRITATES.

Last seen on: –Daily Celebrity Crossword – 1/26/20 0
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Newsday.com Crossword – Nov 20 2018
NY Times Crossword 9 Oct 18, Tuesday

Random information on the term “IRES”:

An internal ribosome entry site, abbreviated IRES, is a RNA element that allows for translation initiation in an cap-independent manner, as part of the greater process of protein synthesis. In eukaryotic translation, initiation typically occurs at the 5′ end of mRNA molecules, since 5′ cap recognition is required for the assembly of the initiation complex. The location for IRES elements is often in the 5’UTR, but can also occur elsewhere in mRNAs.


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IRES sequences were first discovered in 1988 in the poliovirus (PV) and encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) RNA genomes in the labs of Nahum Sonenberg and Eckard Wimmer, respectively. They are described as distinct regions of RNA molecules that are able to recruit the eukaryotic ribosome to the mRNA. This process is also known as cap-independent translation. It has been shown that IRES elements have a distinct secondary or even tertiary structure, but similar structural features at the levels of either primary or secondary structure that are common to all IRES segments have not been reported to date.

IRES on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “NAGS”:

Carbamoyl Phosphate Synthetase I is a ligase enzyme located in the mitochondria involved in the production of urea. Carbamoyl phosphate synthetase I (CPS1 or CPSI) transfers an ammonia molecule from glutamine or glutamate to a molecule of bicarbonate that has been phosphorylated by a molecule of ATP. The resulting carbamate is then phosphorylated with another molecule of ATP. The resulting molecule of carbamoyl phosphate leaves the enzyme.

In E. coli CPSI is a heterodimer with a small subunit and a larger subunit with about 382 and 1073 amino acid residues in size, although in mammals (and other vertebrates) the CPSI protein is encoded by a single gene. The small subunit contains one active site for the binding and deamination of glutamine to make ammonia and glutamate. The large subunit contains two active sites, one for the production of carboxyphosphate, and the other for the production of carbamoyl phosphate. Within the large subunit there are two domains (B and C) each with an active site of the ATP-grasp family. Connecting the two subunits is a tunnel of sorts, which directs the ammonia from the small subunit to the large subunit.

NAGS on Wikipedia

Random information on the term “BUGS”:

Bugs Bunny is an animated cartoon character; created in 1940 by Leon Schlesinger Productions (later Warner Bros. Cartoons) and voiced originally by Mel Blanc. Bugs is best known for his starring roles in the Looney Tunes and Merrie Melodies series of animated short films, produced by Warner Bros. during the golden age of American animation. His popularity during this era led to his becoming an American cultural icon, as well as the official mascot of Warner Bros. Entertainment.

Bugs is an anthropomorphic gray hare or rabbit who is famous for his flippant, insouciant personality; a Brooklyn accent; his portrayal as a trickster; and his catch phrase “Eh… What’s up, doc?”, usually spoken while chewing a carrot. Though a similar rabbit character began appearing in the Warner Bros. cartoon shorts during the late 1930s, the definitive character of Bugs Bunny is widely credited to have made his debut in director Tex Avery’s Oscar-nominated film A Wild Hare (1940).

Since his debut, Bugs has appeared in various short films, feature films, compilations, TV series, music records, comic books, video games, award shows, amusement park rides, and commercials. He has also appeared in more films than any other cartoon character, is the ninth most-portrayed film personality in the world, and has his own star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

BUGS on Wikipedia